Restoration Service

I undertake restorations on all types of clock excluding Grandfather clocks. If you have a clock you would like restored the time and investment required is different in each case. Some jobs require stripping down wood, re-laquering, and often the fabrication of new parts. I always enjoy talking about clocks anyway so if you have a restoration you would like me to provide an estimate for please get in contact via email me at admin@braintreeclockrepairs.co.uk (with pictures if possible) or simply give me a ring on 07462 269529.

See a recent restoration including case here http://www.braintreeclockrepairs.co.uk/2016/02/20/1930s-wall-clock-restoration/

and an example of a full movement clean (part of any restoration on the whole) here http://www.braintreeclockrepairs.co.uk/2016/02/20/how-to-clean-a-clock-movement/

A typical clock restoration – timescales and price guide

A typical restoration involves a complete clean, sourcing and replacement of missing components (e.g. pendulum & glass), and finishing with an agreed material (e.g. wax, laquer, varnish). All this will depend on the clock in question, and also of course what lengths you would ideally like to go to, which in turn reflects budget.

Commissions vary from georgian to victorian clocks through to clocks produced in the first half of the 20th century with the Deco period providing some particularly satisfying work and end results.

If a clock is beyond economic repair I will break the bad news as gently as possible but this only tends to be the case where a movement is either missing parts, or worn beyond repair and cannot be sourced and even then there will be an alternative of some sort. Complete non-starters are not common in my experience and almost all clocks can be considered for restoration at varying levels of cost.  A sentimentally valued clock, say a Smiths mantle clock from the 1950’s, would cost around £70 to restore assuming some parts replacement and refinishing in varnish which would be the  original finish of the clock when it left the factory. A wall clock from the same period might be three or four times that for the same services and a delapidated regulator at the upper end of the scale might be in the low hundreds to bring back to life.

If your reading this section on restorations your probably interested in clocks generally – please have a look at the my clock fix and repair blog on this site and feel free to comment or ask questions if there is anything you can add or would recommend.

The following montage shows some recent work.

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